Eurograd message

Message posted on 18/01/2023

Panel "From Knowing to Mattering ..." Nordic STS Conference / Oslo / June 7-9

Dear all,

we are happy to announce this: together with Stephan Scheel , Leuphana University of Lüneburg, and myself , we are co-convening a panel entitled "From knowing to mattering: How do issues of science and technology in migration control become matters of care and concern?" at the 6th Nordic STS Conference in Oslo , June 7 - June 9, 2023. Submit an abstract until March 1 to our panel and join us there! Further info below and here

!

Best wishes,

Nina & Stephan

Panel: From knowing to mattering: How do issues of science and technology in migration control become matters of care and concern?

Regimes of border and migration control have become heavily militarized and technologized in the past two decades. However, the use of science and technologies for purposes of border enforcement remains contested for various reasons. Concerns range from structural racism and discrimination being inscribed in technologies to lack of transparency, data protection, accountability and oversight of black-boxed technologies and automated decision-making. What remains understudied to date is how critical publics emerge and unfold around such issues, and how critical publics emerge and make a difference in the design and implementation of technologized border and migration regimes. Science and technology studies (STS) offer scholars suitable analytical tools for studying contestations and controversy, how issues turn into matters of concern (Latour 2004, 2005) and care (Puig de la Bellacasa 2011, 2012), how publics emerge (Chilvers and Kearnes 2015), assemble and consolidate around issues as issue-publics (Marres 2005; Marres and Lezaun 2011; Michael, 2017). The issue and practice-oriented understanding of political contestation promises new insights into the articulation of critical issues around technologized migration and border control. To bring STS-inspired methods and analytical sensitivities to bear on borders and migration is crucial for at least three reasons: First, practices of border control are often shrouded in ignorance, secrecy and opaqueness, hence lots of potential issues are hardly known. Secondly, those affected by measures of border control and related technologies and infrastructures are often turned into non-publics and invisible collectives (Broeders and Dijstelbloem 2015). Thirdly, technologically and scientifically innovative means of border control – such as the use of drones and satellites to monitor border zones, facial recognition tunnels in airports facilitating seamless travel or the use of speech biometrics and the analysis of asylum seeker’s mobile phone data for country-of-origin determination– are often introduced in response to migration events which are framed in terms of ‘crisis’, while the technologies themselves are framed as disruptive ‘gamechangers’. Hence, this panel asks –inspired by the conference theme – how issues and publics around the use of science and technology for purposes of border and migration control emerge in a policy field in which narratives of crisis, disruption and repair predominate. This panel is also interested in contributions that explore how controversies unfold in a highly contested policy field, the actors involved and the issues and concerns being articulated, amplified or silenced, as well as the processes and dynamics which enable or inhibit the articulation of issues of science and technology in border and migration control as matters of care and matters of concern. It invites contributions that mobilise STS-inspired concepts and sensitivities to engage with questions such as the following: How do critical and marginalised voices become part of larger publics and controversies? How do issue-publics emerge, and which controversies and concerns gain authority and manage to affect the design, composition and operational logics of surveillance and information infrastructures? What does an STS-inspired, non-anthropocentrical approach add to the study of migrant protests, acts of civil disobedience, migrant solidarity and political participation of non-citizens in representative democracies? Panel Organizers: Nina Amelung and Stephan Scheel

-- "Remember to imagine and craft the worlds you cannot live without, just as you dismantle the ones you cannot live within." — Ruha Benjamin

Recent selected publications:

Amelung, Nina. 2021. Crimmigration Control” across Borders : The Convergence of Migration and Crime Control through Transnational Biometric Databases . Historical Social Research 46 (3): 151-177.

Amelung, Nina. 2021. Politics of (Non)Belonging: Enacting Imaginaries of Affected Publics Through Forensic Genetic Technologies. In: Racism and Racial Surveillance.

Modernity Matters.

Edited By Sheila Khan, Nazir Ahmed Can, Helena Machado. London: Routledge.

Amelung, Nina; Gianolla, Cristiano; Sousa Ribeiro, Joana; Solovova, Olga.

  1. Material Politics of Citizenship: Connecting Migrations With Science and Technology Studies.

London: Routledge.

Amelung, Nina; Machado, Helena. 2021. Governing expectations of forensic innovations in society: the case of FDP in Germany

. New Genetics and Society, 1-22 .

Amelung, Nina; Queirós, Filipa; Machado, Helena. 2021. Desafios éticos e democráticos da vigilância genética na Alemanhae em Portugal , In Machado, Helena (Ed.), Crime e tecnologia: Desafios culturais e políticos para a Europa. Porto: Edições Afrontamento Lda, pp. 41-63. Amelung, Nina; Granja, Rafaela; Machado, Helena. 2021. Modes of Bio-Bordering: The Hidden (Dis)integration of Europe . Singapore: Springer.

Amelung, Nina; Gianolla, Cristiano; Solovova, Olga & Sousa Ribeiro, Joana.

  1. Technologies, infrastructures and migrations: material citizenship politics . Citizenship Studies, 24:5, 587-606.

Amelung, Nina, Rafaela Granja, and Helena Machado. 2020. “Communicating Forensic Genetics: ‘Enthusiastic’ Publics and the Management of Expectations’.” Pp. 209–26 in Exploring Science Communication, edited by S. R. Davies and U. Felt. London; Thousand Oaks, New Delhi, Singapore: Sage.

Machado, Helena, Rafaela Granja, and Nina Amelung. 2020. “Constructing Suspicion Through Forensic DNA Databases in the EU. The Views of the Prüm Professionals .” The British Journal of Criminology 60(1):141–59.

Amelung, Nina and Helena Machado. 2019. “Affected for Good or for Evil : The Formation of Issue-Publics That Relate to the UK National DNA Database .” Public Understanding of Science 28(5):590–605.

--- I am sending this email at a time that suits my workflow. I do not expect a response outside of normal working hours ---

-- "Remember to imagine and craft the worlds you cannot live without, just as you dismantle the ones you cannot live within." — Ruha Benjamin

Recent selected publications:

Amelung, Nina. 2021. Crimmigration Control” across Borders : The Convergence of Migration and Crime Control through Transnational Biometric Databases . Historical Social Research 46 (3): 151-177.

Amelung, Nina. 2021. Politics of (Non)Belonging: Enacting Imaginaries of Affected Publics Through Forensic Genetic Technologies. In: Racism and Racial Surveillance.

Modernity Matters.

Edited By Sheila Khan, Nazir Ahmed Can, Helena Machado. London: Routledge.

Amelung, Nina; Gianolla, Cristiano; Sousa Ribeiro, Joana; Solovova, Olga.

  1. Material Politics of Citizenship: Connecting Migrations With Science and Technology Studies.

London: Routledge.

Amelung, Nina; Machado, Helena. 2021. Governing expectations of forensic innovations in society: the case of FDP in Germany

. New Genetics and Society, 1-22 .

Amelung, Nina; Queirós, Filipa; Machado, Helena. 2021. Desafios éticos e democráticos da vigilância genética na Alemanhae em Portugal , In Machado, Helena (Ed.), Crime e tecnologia: Desafios culturais e políticos para a Europa. Porto: Edições Afrontamento Lda, pp. 41-63. Amelung, Nina; Granja, Rafaela; Machado, Helena. 2021. Modes of Bio-Bordering: The Hidden (Dis)integration of Europe . Singapore: Springer.

Amelung, Nina; Gianolla, Cristiano; Solovova, Olga & Sousa Ribeiro, Joana.

  1. Technologies, infrastructures and migrations: material citizenship politics . Citizenship Studies, 24:5, 587-606.

Amelung, Nina, Rafaela Granja, and Helena Machado. 2020. “Communicating Forensic Genetics: ‘Enthusiastic’ Publics and the Management of Expectations’.” Pp. 209–26 in Exploring Science Communication, edited by S. R. Davies and U. Felt. London; Thousand Oaks, New Delhi, Singapore: Sage.

Machado, Helena, Rafaela Granja, and Nina Amelung. 2020. “Constructing Suspicion Through Forensic DNA Databases in the EU. The Views of the Prüm Professionals .” The British Journal of Criminology 60(1):141–59.

Amelung, Nina and Helena Machado. 2019. “Affected for Good or for Evil : The Formation of Issue-Publics That Relate to the UK National DNA Database .” Public Understanding of Science 28(5):590–605.

--- I am sending this email at a time that suits my workflow. I do not expect a response outside of normal working hours ---


EASST's Eurograd mailing list Eurograd (at) lists.easst.net Unsubscribe or edit subscription options: http://lists.easst.net/listinfo.cgi/eurograd-easst.net

Meet us via https://twitter.com/STSeasst

Report abuses of this list to Eurograd-owner@lists.easst.net

view as plain text
Follow by Email